Articles - Mississauga Psychology Centre

Seasonal Affective Disorder Treatments


No Need to Suffer from the Winter Blahs This Year Every November, the clocks “fall back”. The time change marks the beginning of much shorter days, which means many people will find themselves feeling sad. You might feel blue around the winter holidays, or get into a rut after the fun and festivities have ended. Some people experience serious mood changes year after year, lasting throughout the fall and winter months when there is less Read more

Michele Palk Joins Mississauga Psychology Centre


For immediate release: June 3, 2015 Psychology Associate Michele Palk Joins Mississauga Psychology Centre Team   MISSISSAUGA, ON - The Mississauga Psychology Centre is pleased to announce that Michele Palk has joined the team as an associate staff member. Michele is a registered social worker (RSW) with over 10 years of experience providing therapeutic services to children, adolescents, adults, and families.  She holds master of psychology (M.Psy.) and master of social work (M.S.W.) degrees, and has been Read more

Rob Ford can help you recognize depression in your patients


Illness May Equal…DEPRESSION   Last fall, we were inundated with news of former Toronto mayor Rob Ford’s cancer. While I sat listening to news anchors talk about his condition and what lies ahead for him, I could not help but consider the strong possibility of Councillor Ford developing depression. Yes, depression. Sometimes a person becomes depressed when something very distressing has happened to them, and they cannot control the situation. Depression can result from some medical conditions, Read more

Seasonal Affective Disorder Treatments

NikkiGentles Articles Leave a comment   , , ,

seasonal affective disorder treatments Mississauga Psychology Centre
No Need to Suffer from the Winter Blahs This Year

Every November, the clocks “fall back”. The time change marks the beginning of much shorter days, which means many people will find themselves feeling sad. You might feel blue around the winter holidays, or get into a rut after the fun and festivities have ended. Some people experience serious mood changes year after year, lasting throughout the fall and winter months when there is less natural sunlight.

Winter blues is a general term, not a clinical diagnosis. It is fairly common and considered a more mild than serious condition. It usually clears up on its own and is often associated with something specific, such as stressful holidays or reminders of absent loved ones.

Seasonal Affective Disorder or SAD is a clinical diagnosis that is related to the shortening of daylight hours. SAD interferes with daily functioning over a period of time. A key feature of SAD is that it follows a regular pattern. It appears each year as the seasons change, and it goes away usually during spring and summer.

People with SAD tend to:

1. Be withdrawn
2. Have low energy
3. Oversleep
4. Gain weight
5. Might crave carbohydrates, like cakes, candies and cookies
6. Have feelings of hopelessness and worthlessness
7. Be irritable or moody

Shorter days is the main trigger for SAD. Reduced sunlight in fall and winter can disrupt your body’s internal clock. Shortened daylight hours in the winter can alter the natural rhythm between daytime hours and night. Studies have shown that light therapies relieve SAD symptoms for as much as 70 percent of people.

Growing evidence suggest that Cognitive Behaviour Therapy (CBT) can also help people who have SAD. Therapists at the Mississauga Psychology Center can work with clients to identify and objectively look at negative self-defeating thoughts and reframe these thoughts into something more positive.

If you’re feeling blue this winter and if the feelings are lasting for several weeks, contact the Mississauga Psychology Centre and talk to one of our many skilled therapists. While it is true that SAD will eventually go away, that could take five months or more depending on where you live. Five months is a very long time to suffer when it is treatable.


Michele Palk Joins Mississauga Psychology Centre

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For immediate release: June 3, 2015

Psychology Associate Michele Palk Joins Mississauga Psychology Centre Team

 
MISSISSAUGA, ON – The Mississauga Psychology Centre is pleased to announce that Michele Palk has joined the team as an associate staff member. Michele is a registered social worker (RSW) with over 10 years of experience providing therapeutic services to children, adolescents, adults, and families.  She holds master of psychology (M.Psy.) and master of social work (M.S.W.) degrees, and has been approved to become registered with the College of Psychologists of Ontario.

“As part of the Mississauga Psychology Centre team, Michele will be providing assessment and therapy services,” says Dr. Andrea Myrie-Nurse, founder of the Mississauga Psychology Centre. “Her clinical experiences with abuse, adjustment and mood disorders, behavioural challenges, developmental delays, trauma, and learning disabilities will be a huge asset to the Centre staff and clients.”

“I am committed to providing assessment, therapy, and training services that support the development of healthier individuals, families, and communities,” says Michele Palk. “I welcome the opportunity to work with children, adolescents, and adults through the Mississauga Psychology Centre to determine how to address the challenges they are currently experiencing.”

Michele’s social work career focused on providing frontline child protection services.  She has also conducted court ordered custody and access assessments, trauma assessments, and was a guest lecturer at two faculties of social work in Ontario.  In 2010, Michele became a Certified Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder (FASD) Trainer. She has since provided training, case consultation, and intervention services to families and organizations working with individuals suspected of having, or diagnosed with, FASD.

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 About Mississauga Psychology Centre

The Mississauga Psychology Centre helps people develop strategies and solutions to thrive in school, relationships and life. By providing exemplary specialized care and education for mental health issues, we hope to build healthy communities and help people thrive. Our caring and knowledgeable team of registered psychologists has extensive experience providing assessments and therapy ‒ to children, teens, adults, couples and families ‒ for a range of mental health and behavioural issues. We work with clients to look for insights from past experiences and find solutions to current challenges affecting their ability to perform life tasks optimally.

For more information:
Dr. Andrea Myrie-Nurse, Founder & C. Psych
Mississauga Psychology Centre
P: 416-912-0577
C: 905-601-5888
anurse@mississaugapsychology.com
www.mississaugapsychology.com


Rob Ford can help you recognize depression in your patients

Dr. Andrea Myrie-Nurse Articles Leave a comment   , , , , , , , , ,

Illness May Equal…DEPRESSION

 
Last fall, we were inundated with news of former Toronto mayor Rob Ford’s cancer. While I sat listening to news anchors talk about his condition and what lies ahead for him, I could not help but consider the strong possibility of Councillor Ford developing depression.

Yes, depression.

Sometimes a person becomes depressed when something very distressing has happened to them, and they cannot control the situation. Depression can result from some medical conditions, such as, dementia, hypothyroidism, multiple sclerosis, lupus, cancer, and many others; couple this with substance dependence, particularly alcohol or cocaine, as in Rob Ford’s case, and it is a disaster waiting to happen.

Although not a large percentage of people with symptoms will seek professional help for depression, a large portion will visit a health care provider for some other depression related problem, such as fatigue.

Recognizing the signs of depression is the key to accessing the proper care for people suffering from the effect. Some outward signs of depression may be:

  • Looking sad, dejected or anxious
  • Weight gain or loss
  • Poor hygiene
  • Slow thinking, speech and body movement
  • Trouble concentrating or focusing
  • Decreased energy, tiredness, fatigue
  • Irritability
  •  
    Not every person who is depressed has all the symptoms of depression. There are different levels of depression which are based on the number and the severity of symptoms. Even though a person may not have the required number of symptoms to be diagnosed with clinical depression, the impact can still be devastating.

    If you recognize the signs of depression in one of your patients, or are concerned that their medical condition or substance dependence may lead to it, Mississauga Psychology Centre can help. We are trained psychologists with the skills to diagnose, develop and implement a treatment plan to help your patients alleviate the pain, both emotionally and physically associated with depression.

    Contact us to discuss how we can work together to provide the best care for your patient.
     
    Photo credit: Canadian Pacific / Foter / CC BY-NC


What is the difference between a psychologist and a psychiatrist?

Dr. Andrea Myrie-Nurse FAQ Leave a comment   ,
I am often asked to describe the difference between a psychologist and psychiatrist. My response is usually that a psychologist has a PhD, while a psychiatrist has a medical degree; but the difference between the two professions is far greater.

A psychiatrist adheres to the medical model; thus they assess, diagnose and treat psychological problems by way of biological research. Psychiatrists prescribe medication to alleviate symptoms.

Psychologists, on the other hand, assess, diagnose, and treat psychological problems and the behavioural issues resulting from, or related to physical and mental health. We play a major role in understanding how biological, behavioural and social factors influence health, and illness.

Psychologists are trained to perceive:

  1. How behavioural and cognitive functions are altered
  2. The factors that contribute to alteration of behavioural and cognitive functions
  3. How these dysfunctions are diagnosed and treated


In dealing with such problems, we are also trained and skilled in using several psychological, psychodiagnostic, and psychotherapeutic techniques, which help and affect the abilities of individuals to function in diverse settings and roles. In addition, psychologists help people to modify their behaviour and lifestyle so as to prevent and recover from health problems.

The team as Mississauga Psychology Centre aim to improve the well-being of clients, alleviate their distress, resolve their crises, and increase their ability to solve problems and make decisions.

Methods we use to achieve this include:

  • Psychological assessment, diagnosis and treatment planning;
  • Evidence-based therapy, including cognitive-behaviour therapy, motivational interviewing, relapse prevention, and approaches aimed at reduction of positive symptoms, adaptation to disability and improvement of psychosocial functioning;
  • Family work (family psycho-education, problem solving, therapy to reduce trauma experienced by careers and clients, and to reduce relapse rates).

 

Mississauga Psychology Centre provides interventions in the areas of:

  • Anxiety (OCD, GAD, PTSD, Panic)
  • Mood disorders (depression, bipolar affective disorder)
  • Self-harm
  • Stress
  • Anger Management
  • Relationship issues
  • Learning disability, developmental challenges, behavioural problems, gifted
  • Vocational assessment

  •  
    Mississauga Psychology Centre will work collaboratively with you and your patients to provide optimal mental health service, and help your patients adjust to change or make positive changes to their lifestyle.

    For more information about our service and how we can work together, contact us.